Skip Nav

Federalist Papers

The Pentagon Papers

❶Laws in violation of private contracts, as they amount to aggressions on the rights of those States whose citizens are injured by them, may be considered as another probable source of hostility. Apply these facts to our own case.

Brief Overview

Navigation menu
Space details
Citation Information

Eric Foner and John A. We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us! Subscribe for fascinating stories connecting the past to the present.

Known for their support of a strong national government, the Federalists emphasized commercial and diplomatic harmony with The Alien and Sedition Acts were a series of four laws passed by the U. Congress in amid widespread fear that war with France was imminent. The four laws — which remain controversial to this day — restricted the activities of foreign residents in the country and limited The rebels were mostly ex-Revolutionary War soldiers turned farmers who opposed state The Articles of Confederation was the first written constitution of the United States.

Stemming from wartime urgency, its progress was slowed by fears of central authority and extensive land claims by states before was it was ratified on March 1, Factions are less likely in this form of government because the base of representation is spread over a much larger population. The proposed plan of government will also improve commerce and the wealth of the nation because European nations will be compelled to follow uniform trade regulations enforced by a single navy.

They will become inclined to negotiate for more mutually beneficial trade. The wealth of the nation will improve and the government's revenue will increase, thereby reducing the likelihood for property taxes. The most important function of the government is to provide for the common defense, and the central government should be given as much power as necessary to match the responsibility of providing for the common defense.

The confederacy failed to effectively provide for the common defense because the responsibility fell upon the central government, while the power rested with the states. The central government must be able to maintain standing armies, provide for a national militia, and be able to levy direct taxes to support its common defense and provide for national prosperity.

Fears about the central government becoming too powerful and abusing its military authority or right to tax should be soothed by understanding the role of legislature, or the representatives of the people, in determining the central government's authority to raise an army and levy taxes. Allowing both the federal and state government to levy taxes will ensure that they both have enough funds to effectively plan to meet their different needs.

Critics claim that the Constitutional Convention was not authorized to remove the Articles of Confederation. In fact, resolutions of both the Annapolis Convention and the Confederation Congress allowed for any changes consistent with the needs of the nation.

It contains many of the same powers, only strengthened, and differs only in the number of states required to ratify the changes, requiring only 9 instead of the formerly required Furthermore, the Constitution requires that the people, not the states, are needed to ratify the document and decide whether they will take the advice of the framers or not.

The Federalist papers divide logically into a number of sections, with each having a central theme developed in a succession of short chapters. Consequently, the material will be dealt with in sections. Chapter breaks are indicated for easier reference. The eight chapters in this section laid down the historical groundwork for the arguments on specific constitutional points and political theories to be discussed in detail later.

The opening statement was bold and rather bald, characteristically Hamiltonian in style. The American people, "after an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting Federal Government," were not being called on to consider the adoption of an entirely new United States constitution, a subject of paramount importance.

Anticipating sharp criticism of the proposed constitution, and active opposition to it, Hamilton grouped dissidents into several categories. There were those constitutionally opposed to any change, no matter what. There were those who feared that a change might cost them their jobs.

There were those who liked to fish in troubled waters.

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

The Federalist Papers study guide contains a biography of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Privacy FAQs

A short summary of The Founding Fathers's The Federalist Papers (). This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of The Federalist Papers ().

About Our Ads

The Federalist Papers consist of eighty-five letters written to newspapers in the late s to urge ratification of the U.S. Constitution. With the Constitution needing approval from nine of thirteen states, the press was inundated with letters about the controversial document. The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Cookie Info

The Federalist Papers were a collection of essays in support of the Constitution of the United States. They were written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay in order to persuade New York State to ratify the Constitution. Summary. The Federalist papers divide logically into a number of sections, with each having a central theme developed in a succession of short chapters. Consequently, the material will be .